John C. Lore III

John C. Lore III

Clinical Professor and Director of Trial Advocacy

Contact Information

Law Office: E306
V: 856-225-6222
F: 856-225-6666
jclore@camden.rutgers.edu


Areas of Expertise

Courses Recently Taught

Biography

Professor Lore is the Director of Trial Advocacy.  He trains law students and attorneys throughout the region and country.  His trainings have included statewide trainings of attorneys in Florida, New Jersey, California, and New York and numerous other regional and national trainings for both public interest attorneys and attorneys in private practice.  Professor Lore has been a faculty member for the National Institute for Trial Advocacy (NITA) since 2004 and has taught as both a Team Leader and Program Director.  He also was a faculty member at NITA's 40th Anniversary National Session and received NITA's 2011 Volunteer of the Year Award.  He currently is a faculty member of the Kessler-Eidson Trial Techniques Program at Emory Law School and has previously taught trial advocacy at Northwestern University School of Law.   Professor Lore also provides training to trial advocacy instructors.  

Professor Lore recently was selected as the new co-author for Modern Trial Advocacy: Analysis and Practice (With Steven Lubet) (NITA and Lexis-Nexis) which is one of the country's leading trial advocacy books used by lawyers and students throughout the world.  Modern Trial Advocacy has been adopted by over 90 United States law schools, and has been translated or adapted for use in Japan, Canada, Israel, the Republic of China (Taiwan), the People’s Republic of China, and Chile.

In 2011, Professor Lore created and now directs the Center for Public Interest Training at the Law School which provides free training for public interest lawyers.  Professor Lore's commitment to teaching was recognized by Rutgers when he was awarded the 2012 Chancellor's Award for Civic Engagement, the 2013 Chancellor's Award for Teaching Excellence, and the 2014 Lawyering Professor of the Year.

Professor Lore came to Rutgers in 2006 to become the founding co-director of the Children's Justice Clinic, the first Rutgers Law clinic to focus on children.  As part of the clinic, third-year law students receive academic credit for representing children in southern New Jersey facing juvenile delinquency matters. In addition to providing legal services, students also work with their clients to address the causes of delinquency problems in their home environment.

Prior to joining the Rutgers faculty in 2006, Professor Lore served as the Acting Director of the Farmworker Legal Aid Clinic at Villanova University School of Law. He also has worked as a staff attorney and pro bono coordinator at the Bluhm Legal Clinic of Northwestern University School of Law where he managed the training and supervision of more than 200 Chicago area law firm attorneys who represented children in juvenile court.  Before pursuing a teaching career, he was an assistant public defender at the Defender Association of Philadelphia and the Cook County Public Defender's Office in Chicago.  Throughout his career he has litigated hundreds of trials and motions before a wide variety of courts and administrative agencies.

Professor Lore serves on several committees and boards, including the New Jersey Supreme Court Committee on Minority Concerns. He is an expert on issues of children’s rights, juvenile law, and trial advocacy and has been a frequent contributor to various media outlets throughout the country. 

Publications

Modern Trial Advocacy:  Analysis and Practice, (National Institute for Trial Advocacy), (Work in progress and under contract for 5th edition to be published in Winter 2014) (With Steven Lubet).

Case File and Problems: Teaching Materials in Child Advocacy (Work in progress to be published by Lexis-Nexis and the National Institute for Trial Advocacy) (With Mike Dale).

New Jersey Collateral Consequences of Criminal Convictions,  (Lexis Nexis 2014) (With Todd Berger).

Civil Consequences of Criminal Convictions, Manual for Defender Association of Philadelphia and Pennsylvania Public Defender Offices, September 2011. 

Strategies for Children’s Attorneys:  How to Handle Pre-Trial Self Incrimination Issues for Child Clients Undergoing Screening, Assessment, Evaluation and Treatment, 2009 National Association of Counsel for Children: Children’s Law Manual 227.  

Pre-Trial Self-Incrimination in Juvenile Court:  Why a Comprehensive Pre-trial Privilege is Needed to Protect Children and Enhance the Goal of Rehabilitation, 47 U. Louisville L. Rev 439 (Winter 2009).

Good (First) Step for Protecting Juveniles in the Juvenile Justice System: How New Jersey Provides Limited Pre-Trial Protection Against Self-Incrimination, 196 New Jersey Law Journal 458 (May 2009) (With John Bennett).

Shackling Children in Juvenile Court: The History, The Debate and Recent Trends, 12 U.C. Davis J. Juv. L. & Pol’y 453 (Summer 2008) (With Brian D. Gallagher).

Protecting Abused, Neglected and Abandoned Children:  A Proposal for Provisional Out-of-State Kinship Placements Pursuant to the Interstate Compact on the Placement of Children, 40 U. Mich. L.J. Reform 57 (Fall 2006).

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