Ann E.  Freedman

Ann E. Freedman

Associate Professor

Contact Information

Law Office: 600D
V: (856) 225-6389
F: (856) 225-6516
aefreedm@camden.rutgers.edu


Areas of Expertise

Courses Recently Taught

Biography

Professor Freedman teaches courses on constitutional law, family law, domestic violence law, sex discrimination and the law, and reproduction, sexuality, and the law.  
Prior to joining the Rutgers faculty, Professor Freedman taught at Georgetown University Law Center, Villanova Law School, and the University of Pennsylvania.  In 1974, she co-founded the Women's Law Project, a public interest law firm located in Philadelphia, and from 1976 to 1979, she served as an assistant defender at the Defender Association of Philadelphia, representing indigent defendants in juvenile and adult criminal courts.
Professor Freedman has for many years contributed to the development of the law school’s clinical programs, including the Domestic Violence Clinic and the Pro Bono Domestic Violence Program, which was founded in 1995.  She is the faculty co-coordinator of the Mary Philbrook Award Ceremony, a prominent public interest award, inaugurated in 1986 and named for the first woman attorney in New Jersey, that honors attorneys, judges and other social activists, as well as Rutgers students, for their contributions to equal justice and the public interest.  She also serves on the advisory board of the Domestic Violence Legal Empowerment and Appeals Project at George Washington University Law School.

Publications

Her most recent article is "Fact-finding in Civil Domestic Violence Cases: Secondary Traumatic Stress and The Need for Compassionate Witnesses," 11 Am. U. J. of Gender, Soc. Pol’y & Law 567 (2003).
Professor Freedman is co-author of a pathbreaking textbook, Sex Discrimination and the Law: History, Practice and Theory, (1996) and of other books on sex discrimination law and the Equal Rights Amendment. She is also a co-author “The Equal Rights Amendment: A Constitutional Basis for Rights for Women,”, 81 Yale L.J. 871 (1971), which gave the Equal Rights Amendment its modern legal form, and author of "Sex Equality, Sex Differences and the Supreme Court," 92 Yale L.J. 913 (1983).

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